It eats your skin, then explodes inside: meet the demodex mite

They crawl around your face at night, feeding off your oil and skin cells. They have no anus, so eventually explode inside your hair follicles.Meet the demodex mite, an eight-legged arachnid that mates on your face during the night before turning your facial pores into a nest.“Everybody’s got them. They’re a normal thing that lives on the skin,” medical director of Skin & Cancer Foundation Australia Stephen Shumack said.

via It eats your skin, then explodes inside: meet the demodex mite.

What’s with all the Andrew Bolt?

susanai:

I laugh when I’m told the ABC is left leaning – I find it increasingly right leaning. I agree with wholeheartedly with this article on Bolt.

Originally posted on TruthInNewsMedia:

Comment

By Barry Tucker                    7 April, 2014

Something strange is going on in the world of Andrew Bolt. The federal government, commercial media and the tax-payer funded ABC (which he loathes) are going out of their way to promote him.

It’s strange because Bolt has been convicted under Section 18C and 18D of the Racial Discrimination Act for remarks he made about fair-skinned persons who he claimed were describing themselves as Indigenous in order to claim financial benefit and kudos. It’s strange because the word “controversial” usually accompanies any mention of him. It’s strange because while he says he’s a climate change doubter he pushes the lines of the climate change deniers, those who have framed the “doubt over reason” campaign.

It’s strange because Bolt generally pushes “Liberal” party policies, which are increasingly like those of the USA’s Mad Hatter’s Tea Party. And…

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How Canada can protect the world’s whales | WWF Canada BlogWWF Canada Blog

Let’s start with the good news. For the most part, whales in Canada’s waters are recovering. North Atlantic right whales, once hunted to the brink of extinction, have almost doubled in number. There are more Fin whales and Humpbacks in Canada’s Pacific waters every year. Just last summer, for the first time in 62 years, two Pacific Right Whales were spotted off B.C.’s coast.

via How Canada can protect the world’s whales | WWF Canada BlogWWF Canada Blog.

North American Leaders Commit to Protecting Monarch Butterfly Migration | WWF Canada BlogWWF Canada Blog

Monarch butterfly

Recent scientific evidence by WWF and Mexico’s National Commission on Natural Protected Areas document a steady decline of monarch butterflies in the hibernating sanctuaries in Mexico. In December 2013, scientists recorded the lowest levels on record, with monarchs covering a mere 0.67 hectares (1.65 acres) of forest cover — a 44% decrease from the previous year.

via North American Leaders Commit to Protecting Monarch Butterfly Migration | WWF Canada BlogWWF Canada Blog.

The Darkling Thrush by Thomas Hardy : The Poetry Foundation

I leant upon a coppice gate

When Frost was spectre-grey,

And Winter’s dregs made desolate

The weakening eye of day.

The tangled bine-stems scored the sky

Like strings of broken lyres,

And all mankind that haunted nigh

Had sought their household fires.

via The Darkling Thrush by Thomas Hardy : The Poetry Foundation.

Thank you Thomas Hardy.

The boats always come back – and when they do, Australia will have to draw on fresh reserves of cruelty | David Marr | Comment is free | theguardian.com

“There were guys who wet themselves and shit their pants out of total fear,” said the man from Manus. “There was blood everywhere; faces kicked in, noses – it’s all head injuries. I just remember blood everywhere I looked. Blood everywhere.”The nation holds its nose, averts its eyes. This isn’t us. Tony Abbott assured Andrew Bolt at the weekend, “We are by nature a generous and welcoming people.” But we will not be deterred by these regrettable events. We have to stop the boats. “And thank God the boats are stopping.”

via The boats always come back – and when they do, Australia will have to draw on fresh reserves of cruelty | David Marr | Comment is free | theguardian.com.

Slope Streaks on Mars

Originally posted on Planetary Geomorphology Image of the Month:

Post by Dr Norbert Schörghofer, University of Hawaii, Honolulu.

Slope streaks are a form of down-slope mass movement on the surface of Mars that frequently occurs on Mars today (Image 1 and 2). Slope streaks were first identified on high-resolution Viking Orbiter images, but their present-day activity was only discovered in Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) images.

Image 1. A portion of a Mars Orbiter Camera image taken on 1999-10-28.

Image 1. A portion of a Mars Orbiter Camera image taken on 1999-10-28.

Image 2: An Image of the same area taken on 2002-06-10. A large new slope streak formed, while numerous other streaks persisted. North is up and illumination is from the lower left (Schorghofer et al. 2007).

Image 2: An Image of the same area taken on 2002-06-10. A large new slope streak formed, while numerous other streaks persisted. North is up and illumination is from the lower left (Schorghofer et al. 2007).

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