In Greenland, a glacier’s collapse shows climate impact | The Wider Image | Reuters

Perched on a cliff above Greenland’s Helheim glacier, I tried calling my wife in New York on a satellite phone. Before I could leave a message, an explosion broke the arctic silence.

More explosions followed.

I ran across a muddy tundra to a video camera on a tripod overlooking the glacier and ripped off the trash bag I had used to protect it. I hit record as fast as I could focus.

via In Greenland, a glacier’s collapse shows climate impact | The Wider Image | Reuters

‘It’s dire’: farmers battle their worst drought in 100 years – photo essay | Environment | The Guardian

“It’s a pretty tough old time,” says Coonabarabran farmer Ambrose Doolan. “But if you’re working with your family and everyone is looking out for each other, you count your blessings.” In the central-west region of New South Wales, farmers continue to battle a crippling drought that many locals are calling the worst since 1902. In Warrumbungle shire, where sharp peaks fall away to once fertile farmland, the small town of Coonabarabran is running out of water.

via ‘It’s dire’: farmers battle their worst drought in 100 years – photo essay | Environment | The Guardian

Small Farms in Rural India Are Using Affordable, High-tech Greenhouses to Adapt to Climate Change

Yadav Bhavanth grows vegetables on family land in the south-central Indian state of Telangana. On this small farm in a drought-prone region, his crop production—and income—depend heavily on seasonal rainfall.

In 2015 and 2016, water shortages threatened his crops. And when the rains came, they were often so heavy that they damaged even the hardier plants, causing disease or infestation.

via Small Farms in Rural India Are Using Affordable, High-tech Greenhouses to Adapt to Climate Change

Where have all our insects gone? | Environment | The Guardian

When Simon Leather was a student in the 1970s, he took a summer job as a postman and delivered mail to the villages of Kirk Hammerton and Green Hammerton in North Yorkshire. He recalls his early morning walks through its lanes, past the porches of houses on his round. At virtually every home, he saw the same picture: windows plastered with tiger moths that had been attracted by lights the previous night and were still clinging to the glass. “It was quite a sight,” says Leather, who is now a professor of entomology at Harper Adams University in Shropshire.

But it is not a vision that he has experienced in recent years. Those tiger moths have almost disappeared. “You hardly see any, although there used to be thousands in summer and that was just a couple of villages.”

via Where have all our insects gone? | Environment | The Guardian

France is building a village for people with Alzheimer’s | World Economic Forum

France is building its first “Alzheimer’s village” in an experiment aimed at improving the lives of people with the disease.

Alzheimer’s is the most common form of dementia. It is an irreversible, progressive disorder that damages and eventually destroys brain cells, leading to memory loss and impaired cognitive skills.

via France is building a village for people with Alzheimer’s | World Economic Forum

Climate Change May Spark Global ‘Fish Wars’ Thanks to Warming Waters

ATLANTIC MACKEREL, A fatty schooling fish, for years has been caught by fleets in parts of Europe and sold around the world—where it gets pickled, grilled, smoked, and fried. It is among the United Kingdom’s key exports.

But a decade ago, warming temperatures began driving this popular fish north, into seas controlled by Iceland. Almost overnight, this seafood gold began shredding relations between some of the world’s most stable governments. It led to unsustainable fishing, trade embargoes, and boat blockades. It even helped convince Iceland to drop its bid to join the EU. And that was among friendly nations.

via Climate Change May Spark Global ‘Fish Wars’ Thanks to Warming Waters

Abuse of Children

ON THE south side of Alice Springs, a Thursday afternoon, five adults are gathered around a sedan at the entrance to the showgrounds. A man king-hits a woman and she goes down, hard. She is helped up, then carefully lined up and smashed again, in the face. She’s so drunk she has no hope of defending the punch. She goes down again.

Sitting on the window ledge of the car, watching, is a child. This is what she thinks is normal: incoherent adults enacting the brutal afternoon rituals of total alcohol dysfunction, as desensitised locals drive by with barely a glance.

via The fight to protect indigenous children from abuse and neglect

ANZAC DAY

Australians in Antarctica have held an Anzac Day dawn service against a “backdrop of icebergs”.

UpdatedUpdated 7 hours ago
By Nick Baker
Australians working in Antarctica have held the southern-most Anzac Day dawn service, at temperatures of -15 degrees Celsius.

A team of 26 expeditioners who are spending the winter at the Casey research station gathered at the station’s flag-pole just before dawn.

They lowered the Australian flag to half-mast, listened to several readings and held the traditional two minutes of silence.

via Australian Antarctic base marks Anzac Day in subzero temperatures