Talking about Ouroboros

 

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Talking about Ouroboros
Origins of the OuroborosThe Serpent biting its own tail is first seen as early as 1600 years BC in Egypt. From there it moved to the Phonecians and then to the Greeks, who called it the Ouroboros, which means devouring its tail.The serpent biting its tail is found in other mythoi as well, including Norse myth, where the serpent’s name is Jörmungandr, and in Hindu, where the dragon circles the tortoise which supports the four elephants that carry the world.Alternate spellings include: oroborus, uroboros, and oureboros. Symbology behind the OuroborosThe ouroboros has several meanings interwoven into it. Foremost is the symbolism of the serpent biting, devouring, eating its own tail. This symbolises the cyclic Nature of the Universe: creation out of destruction, Life out of Death. The ouroboros eats its own tail to sustain its life, in an eternal cycle of renewal.In the above drawing, from a book by an early Alchemist, Cleopatra, the black half symbolises the Night, Earth, and the destructive force of nature, yin. the light half represents Day, Heaven, the generative, creative force, yang.Alchemically, the ouroboros is also used as a purifying glyph

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Talking about Intel, TSMC join forces on new Atom markets | Technology | Reuters

 

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Talking about Intel, TSMC join forces on new Atom markets | Technology | Reuters
TSMC have agreed to team up to develop and make the low-cost Atom chip for use in a swathe of consumer electronics devices, expanding its use beyond netbooks as the chip makers target new markets in a deepening recession.The move represents a major departure for Intel, which has always manufactured its own microprocessors but is now forced to bring in partners, analysts said.The world’s largest chip maker and the world’s biggest producer of made-to-order chips said on Monday Intel plans to combine the circuitry of its Atom, which is prevalent in ultra-small laptops, with the circuitry of other chips, creating a new architecture

Talking about Bush-era memo saw wide powers in U.S. terrorism war | Politics | Reuters

 

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Talking about Bush-era memo saw wide powers in U.S. terrorism war | Politics | Reuters
Bush-era memo saw wide powers in U.S. terrorism warMon Mar 2, 2009 5:19pm EST Email | Print | Share| Reprints | Single Page[-] Text [+] By Randall MikkelsenWASHINGTON (Reuters) – The U.S. military could have kicked in doors to raid a suspected terrorist cell in the United States without a warrant under a Bush-era legal memo the Justice Department made public on Monday.The memo, from October 23, 2001, also said constitutional free-speech protections and a prohibition on unreasonable search and seizure could take a back seat to military needs in fighting terrorism inside the country.It was one of nine previously undisclosed memos and legal opinions which shed light on former U.S. President George W. Bush’s legal guidance as he launched