BBC News – World’s 2010 nature target ‘will not be met’

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The world’s governments will not meet their internationally-agreed target of curbing the loss of species and nature by 2010, a major study has confirmed.

Virtually all species and ecosystems show continued decline, while pressures on nature are increasing, it concludes.

Published in the journal Science, the study confirms what conservationists have known for several years.

The 2010 target was adopted in 2002, but the scientists behind this study say implementation has been "woeful".

BBC News – World’s 2010 nature target ‘will not be met’

BBC NEWS | Science & Environment | Recipe for rescuing our reefs

 

The colourful world supported by coral reefs is under threat as oceans absorb greater quantities of carbon dioxide, says Rod Salm. In this week’s Green Room, he says we must accept that we are going to lose many of these valuable ecosystems, but adds that not all hope is lost.

Great Barrier Reef coral (Image: James Cook University)

Imagine all the colour and vibrancy of coral reefs fading away into fuzzy, crumbling greys and browns, and you’re left with a coral graveyard that could become the norm

I’ve been privileged to see many of the world’s finest and least disturbed reefs.

Mine were the first human eyes to see many of the remotest reefs at a time when we really could describe them as pristine.

I would never have dreamed that they were at risk from people, far less than from something as remote then as climate change

BBC NEWS | Science & Environment | Recipe for rescuing our reefs

The coming famine: risks and solutions for global food security (Science Alert)

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Most of us have by now heard the forecast there will be 9.2 billion people in the world of 2050. But current projections suggest human numbers will not stop there – but will keep on climbing, to at least 11.4 billion, by the mid 2060s.

Equally, the world economy will continue to grow – and China, India and other advancing economies will require more protein food. 
Thus, global demand for food will more than double over the coming half-century, as we add another 4.7 billion people. By then we will eat around 600 quadrillion calories a day, which is the equivalent of feeding 14 billion people at today’s nutritional levels.

The central issue in the human destiny in the coming half century is not climate change or the global financial crisis.

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It is whether humanity can achieve and sustain such an enormous harvest

The coming famine: risks and solutions for global food security (Science Alert)

Plan to expand reef ship reporting zone

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All ships passing southern parts of the Great Barrier Reef will be forced to report positions and be tracked by satellite from July next year under an Australian government proposal.

The Australian Maritime Safety Authority (AMSA) advice follows the grounding of the Sheng Neng I coal carrier this month on Douglas Shoal, outside the current mandatory reporting zone.

Expanding the reporting and tracking zone must be ratified by the International Maritime Organisation

Plan to expand reef ship reporting zone

BBC News – Judge allows start of bids on controversial Brazil dam

 

Judge allows start of bids on controversial Brazil dam

James Cameron and Sigourney Weaver at protest against Belo Monte project in Brasilia, 12 April 2010

James Cameron and Sigourney Weaver are among high-profile opponents of the dam

A Brazilian court has overturned a ruling that could have delayed building a massive dam on an Amazon tributary.

A judge ruled bidding can go ahead next week for contracts to build the Belo Monte dam on the River Xingu. It would be the third largest dam in the world.

The dam is opposed by indigenous groups and environmentalists.

They say thousands of indigenous people will be displaced and a sensitive ecosystem damaged. The government says it is crucial for economic development.

BBC News – Judge allows start of bids on controversial Brazil dam

Scientists cleared of malpractice in UEA’s hacked emails inquiry | Environment | guardian.co.uk

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The climate scientists at the centre of a media storm over emails released on the internet were disorganised but did not fudge their results, an independent inquiry into the affair reported today.

The inquiry, the second of three set up in the wake of the controversy, found "absolutely no evidence of any impropriety whatsoever", according to Lord Oxburgh, who led the investigation.

Instead, Oxburgh said, many of the criticisms and assertions of scientific misconduct were likely made by people "who do not like the implications of some the conclusions" reached by the climate experts

Scientists cleared of malpractice in UEA’s hacked emails inquiry | Environment | guardian.co.uk

Pluto’s family set to grow tenfold – ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

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New research by Australian scientists suggests the number of objects in the solar system classed as dwarf planets should grow by a factor of ten.

The work, which will appear in the Proceedings of the 9th Australian Space Science Conference and published on the prepublication website ArXiv.org, would see a number of objects join the former planet Pluto in this newly defined family

Pluto’s family set to grow tenfold – ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)