Creative Self-Destruction and the Climate

In his 2006 landmark report on how we should respond to the climate crisis, Nicholas Stern characterised global warming as an ‘externality’, a damage to others due to market activity whose cost is not met by those who cause it.Indeed, Stern characterised climate change as ‘the largest ever market failure’. In other words, the problem of global warming arises because the market system is not working well enough, and if we could find a way to correct the fault then the problem would be solved.

Source: Creative Self-Destruction and the Climate

Australia’s next wave of startups could be from the over-55s

Senior entrepreneurs are Australia’s fastest-growing segment of entrepreneurs, despite facing significant barriers including ageism and a lack of financial support, according to new research from the Swinburne University of Technology and Queensland University of Technology.The research, funded by National Seniors Australia, studied more than 400 seniors through interviews, focus groups and online surveys. Key findings include:34% of all young firms in Australia are now led by seniorpreneursThe average age of seniorpreneurs is 57Seniorpreneurs work about five fewer hours than younger entrepreneurs each week and have almost double the industry experience.

Source: Australia’s next wave of startups could be from the over-55s

World’s longest continental volcanic chain, the Cosgrove hotspot track, discovered in Australia – Science – ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

The world’s longest chain of continental volcanoes has been discovered stretching for more than 2,000 kilometres along eastern Australia.The ancient volcanic chain, reported in the journal Nature, runs from Cape Hillsborough on the central Queensland coast, south-west through central New South Wales to Cosgrove in Victoria.”This volcanic chain was created over the past 33 million years, as Australia moved north-northeast over a mantle plume hotspot which we believe is now located in Bass Strait,” said the study’s lead author, Dr Rhodri Davies of the Australian National University.

Source: World’s longest continental volcanic chain, the Cosgrove hotspot track, discovered in Australia – Science – ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

British Beavers Gnaw Their Way Back, but Are They Worth a Dam? – WSJ

OTTERY ST. MARY, England—When beavers surfaced in the River Otter, Mark Owen smelled a rat.It had been centuries—probably before poet Samuel Taylor Coleridge was born in this village in 1772—since wild beavers plied the region. In recent years, any local beavers were kept as curiosities or for research, living behind electric fences.Eurasian beaverEurasian beaver“Nobody, as far as I know, has reported that they’ve lost beavers,” says Mr. Owen, freshwater director of England’s Angling Trust, a sportfishing-advocacy group that wants the rodents removed. His conclusion: “The beavers were illegally released.”

Source: British Beavers Gnaw Their Way Back, but Are They Worth a Dam? – WSJ

Travel Trip Journey: Kata Tjuta, A Group of Large Dome Formation in Central Australia

Kata Tjuta, is also called “Kata Joota”, and also famous as “Mount Olga” or colloquially as “The Olgas”, are a group of large domed rock formations “bornhardts” cover an area of 21.68 km2 located about 365 kilometers southwest of Alice Springs, in the southern part of the Northern Territory, central Australia. Both Uluru, and Kata Tjuta / Mount Olga form are the two major landmarks within the Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park. The majestically beautiful 36 domes that made up of Kata Tjuta / Mount Olga are composed of conglomerate, a sedimentary rock containing of cobbles and boulders of varying rock types as well as granite and basalt, cemented by a matrix of sandstone. Moreover, the alternative name, “The Olgas”, comes from the tallest peak, Mt. Olga, which is, highest point is 3,497 feet above sea level. In 1872, Mt. Olga was given name by Ernest Giles in the honor of Queen Olga of Wurttemberg. In 15 December 1993, a dual naming policy was adopted that allowed official names both traditional Aboriginal name and the English name. As a result, Mount Olga was renamed Mount Olga / Kata Tjuta. However, on 6 November 2002, the dual name was officially reversed to Kata Tjuta / Mount Olga.

Source: Travel Trip Journey: Kata Tjuta, A Group of Large Dome Formation in Central Australia

Climate change will cause the death of one Earth and the birth of another | Grist

A few years ago in a lab in Panama, Klaus Winter tried to conjure the future. A plant physiologist at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute, he planted seedlings of 10 tropical tree species in small, geodesic greenhouses. Some he allowed to grow in the kind of environment they were used to out in the forest, around 79 degrees F. Others, he subjected to uncomfortably high temperatures. Still others, unbearably high temperatures — up to a daily average temperature of 95 F and a peak of 102 F. That’s about as hot as Earth has ever been.

Source: Climate change will cause the death of one Earth and the birth of another | Grist

Zombie politics vs climate action: will the coming election focus on our future?

The issue of climate change has had a significant and polarising impact on Australian politics in recent years. The political fortunes of several major players have revolved around it. While Kevin Rudd’s call to arms on the “great moral challenge of our generation” was rhetorically memorable, the debate in Australia has largely focused on developing policies that do not significantly alter the economic status quo.Since 2007, when Rudd capitalised on the zeitgeist of climate change concern, the political debate has shifted from advocating policies to deal with the challenge to those that “axe the tax”. Australian politics has wrestled with climate change as both an existential global scientific phenomenon and a parochial political and ideological issue.

Source: Zombie politics vs climate action: will the coming election focus on our future?