Climate Chaos Is Coming — and the Pinkertons Are Ready – The New York Times

he Pinkertons wanted me to picture myself in a scene of absolute devastation. “A hurricane just wipes out everything, and you need to feed your children,” Andres Paz Larach said. The power grid is down, shipments of food are cut off, the water is no longer potable — how do you get what you need to survive? What risks do you take? It was a hot early morning in March, and we were driving through a pine forest high in the mountains surrounding Santa Ana Jilotzingo, 25 miles northwest of Mexico City. Our Suburban, equipped with bulletproof windows and reinforced doors, labored slowly over the dirt road, which appeared to have been washed out by a recent thunderstorm.

Climate Chaos Is Coming — and the Pinkertons Are Ready – The New York Times

New approach could boost energy capacity of lithium batteries | MIT News

Researchers around the globe have been on a quest for batteries that pack a punch but are smaller and lighter than today’s versions, potentially enabling electric cars to travel further or portable electronics to run for longer without recharging. Now, researchers at MIT and in China say they’ve made a major advance in this area, with a new version of a key component for lithium batteries, the cathode.

New approach could boost energy capacity of lithium batteries | MIT News

HAJAR (abandoned)

ianscyberspace

Hajar peeped out through a door crack in the hut she was being held in. She was beginning to respond to that name now though was aware it hadn’t been the name her mother called her. She didn’t know how old she was or the circumstances in which she’d been herded into a truck with these other women as her mother screamed while being dragged into a separate vehicle. She couldn’t remember the last time she’d seen her father.

The hut was in darkness apart from stray sunbeams penetrating cracks in this door or the boarded-up windows. Twice a day, men in uniform delivered basic food shoving it roughly into the centre of the room while others watching from the guarded door laughed as hungry women fought each other for whatever they could grab. Hajar had been taken under her wing by one of the women who appeared to be…

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Global Warming’s Frozen Giant, Permafrost is thawing #auspol #qldpol #StopAdani

This is horrifying.

jpratt27

Global Warming’s Frozen Giant

Scientists are braving Arctic winters to study carbon frozen in soil.

They keep finding surprises — all of them bad.

Nala Rogers, Staff Writer

(Inside Science) — It was dusk when Nikita Zimov limped to the icy riverbank and its lifesaving supply of driftwood. He had pushed himself hard the last few exhausting miles, knowing that he would freeze to death if he didn’t find firewood before dark. He built a fire and huddled by the flames, trying to dry his sodden clothes as snow continued to fall. He peeled off one boot to expose his throbbing toe, and saw that the nail was bruised and broken from a day spent struggling across the tundra.

If it were summer, he’d have taken a boat upriver to his destination — a patch of Siberian tundra where instruments monitored the flow of greenhouse gases between air and soil…

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Dirty air: how India became the most polluted country on earth 

Arvind Kumar, a chest surgeon at New Delhi’s Sir Ganga Ram Hospital, has a ringside view of the toll that northern India’s deteriorating air quality is taking on its residents. When he started practising 30 years ago, some 80 to 90 per cent of his lung cancer patients were smokers, mostly men, aged typically in their 50s or 60s.

But in the past six years, half of Dr Kumar’s lung cancer patients have been non-smokers, about 40 per cent of them women. Patients are younger too, with 8 per cent in their 30s and 40s.

To Dr Kumar, the dramatic shift in the profiles of lung cancer patients has a clear cause: air fouled by dirty diesel exhaust fumes, construction dust, rising industrial emissions and crop burning, which has created heavy loads of harmful pollutants in the air.

via Dirty air: how India became the most polluted country on earth 

Overlooked No More: Minnie Mae Freeman Penney, Nebraska’s ‘Fearless Maid’ – The New York Times

Alexandra S. Levine
It was unseasonably warm on Jan. 12, 1888, as Minnie Freeman made her way to a school in rural Nebraska, where she was a teacher.

Temperatures had been climbing well into the 40s that month, a respite from the bitter cold that usually gripped the prairie in the dead of winter.

Shortly after she arrived, the students, whose ages were about 5 to 15 — shuffled into the tiny Midvale School and the lesson began. By noon, a light morning frost had melted, and the sky seemed to be clearing.

Then, over lunch, a deadly snowstorm struck.

via Overlooked No More: Minnie Mae Freeman Penney, Nebraska’s ‘Fearless Maid’ – The New York Times

In Greenland, a glacier’s collapse shows climate impact | The Wider Image | Reuters

Perched on a cliff above Greenland’s Helheim glacier, I tried calling my wife in New York on a satellite phone. Before I could leave a message, an explosion broke the arctic silence.

More explosions followed.

I ran across a muddy tundra to a video camera on a tripod overlooking the glacier and ripped off the trash bag I had used to protect it. I hit record as fast as I could focus.

via In Greenland, a glacier’s collapse shows climate impact | The Wider Image | Reuters

‘It’s dire’: farmers battle their worst drought in 100 years – photo essay | Environment | The Guardian

“It’s a pretty tough old time,” says Coonabarabran farmer Ambrose Doolan. “But if you’re working with your family and everyone is looking out for each other, you count your blessings.” In the central-west region of New South Wales, farmers continue to battle a crippling drought that many locals are calling the worst since 1902. In Warrumbungle shire, where sharp peaks fall away to once fertile farmland, the small town of Coonabarabran is running out of water.

via ‘It’s dire’: farmers battle their worst drought in 100 years – photo essay | Environment | The Guardian